Fit Focus Flair

Do you ‘over-sell’ the message when you speak? ‘To Fly to Serve’ does it worse

It should be brilliant, but it’s not.  It’s BA’s new brand message in wide-screen, film-shot format.

British Airways relaunches itself with new slogan that nods to its imperial origins | Mail Online.

It’s expensively made, lavishly appointed and brilliantly placed for the TV viewers it wants to lure back to the arms of the self-appointed ‘Flag Carrier’ for the UK.  Trouble is it’s not much good overall.  It’s the oppostite of the typical corporate presentation.  The story is great, the pictures are delicious but the telling is terrible.  Not even competent.

The voice-over artist spoils everything.  He gets in the way of the pictures, he undermines the story and murders the ‘punchline’.  The famous thespian should be shot (but this time without sound).  That’s the problem with actors, particularly famous ones, they tend to act.  Brilliant actors just say the words and trust that the words will do the work.  And if the words are good, they will.

Watch it for yourself and tell me that the script, simply spoken, with no added drama, would not have made you moved much more than this fifth-form, forced ham-fistedness.  I bet the writer and the director are fuming from their summer homes in the Bahamas.

 

This is a part of my Fit, Focus & Flair model. To be great, a presentation must be a perfect FIT for the situation; the content must have complete FOCUS on it’s purpose and message; and it must have enough FLAIR to stand out on the day, and in our memories. Learn more about developing your Fit, Focus and Flair.

 

Jim Harvey

Jim Harvey

Managing Director at The Message Business
Jim is the MD of The Message Business, a company which helps FTSE 100 companies to sell themselves, and their products better. Speech writer, Prezi trainer and designer, coach and consultant, Jim also finds time to be a proud father and husband.
Jim Harvey
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  1. Pingback: You’re always pitching when you’re presenting- Jan Schultink’s pitfalls in IPO presentations

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