How do I Design Slides for Sharing Lots of Information?

February 6, 2013

in Creating your visual aids

Educators face some of the most difficult challenges when it comes to designing presentation slides. Teachers and lecturers have a huge amount of information to share, and often need to provide chunks of text for reference, long quotes, and text-heavy presentations. If you’re sharing a lot of information, how can you still make your slides look minimal, interesting and helpful?

Ask yourself: do they really need so much information?

You’re sharing lots of information in your presentation – that doesn’t mean your audience will need to see everything you say in writing. If it’s not important that they remember this point, why type in your on your slides? Make yourself a separate script, and you won’t be so tempted to dump chunks of text into your slides.

Consider Hand-outs Instead

Sometimes, you need to share lots of information, and make sure your audience will be able to refer back to it later. Including that information on a hand-out saves you a headache, and allows you to concentrate on using your slides for emphasis and explanation.

Split it up

information overload

If you have to share lots on information on your slides, split it up so that you’re only making one point at a time. You could even spread complex points over multiple slides. The less information being shown at any one time, the more likely your audience are to still be listening, and to understand what you’re saying.

How do I Design Slides for Sharing Lots of Information?

First of all, do everything you can not to. Think seriously about your audience and what they need to know. There’s a difference between needing to hear something, and needing it laid out on a slide.

If you have to share lots of information, break it up and spread it out to avoid information overload.

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Hannah Jones
Hannah has spent the last few months getting to know PowerPoint and Prezi, and sharpening her design skills. Hannah shares presentation design and delivery advice as she learns it, and can often be found sharing the articles which have helped her on Twitter @impacttips.
Hannah Jones

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