Confidence

Painful Lessons That Can Help the Presenter Grow


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Kintsukuroi (or Kintsugi as it’s also known) is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery by putting the pieces back together again with a lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold, silver or platinum. It treats breakage and repair as part of the history of an object, rather than something to disguise, and, with all its wounds and scars, the resulting object is even more beautiful than before.

It’s such an appealing philosophy that something broken can be fixed with love and skill, and one that perhaps we as humans, let alone presenters, would do well to believe in. We all fall down at some point and it is how we get back up, pick up the pieces and move forward that is the key. Flaws and imperfection can me embraced.

In this article Jim Harvey shares 3 examples of when he got it badly wrong while presenting and the lessons that he learned from each event. Then there’s a set of examples of the fall and failures of some really famous people (like I said, it can – and does – happen to anyone!).

You can read the full article here: Fixed with Gold – the Painful Lessons That Help the Presenter Grow

Jim Harvey

Jim Harvey

Managing Director at The Message Business
Jim is the MD of The Message Business, a company which helps FTSE 100 companies to sell themselves, and their products better. Speech writer, Prezi trainer and designer, coach and consultant, Jim also finds time to be a proud father and husband.
Jim Harvey
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